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Menorah

Discussions regarding the roots and practices of ancient religious and occult traditions including, but not limited to, Sumerian, Egyptian, Kabbalah and the mythos behind them.

Menorah

Postby Occult Forum Archive » Fri Nov 19, 2004 9:03 pm

Original post: Belzedek

I considered sharing this with the members,in concerns of Kabbalah and the Menorah in particular,for those 'pop-Kabbalists' please pass over without reading what I have to write in that I have NO regard for willy-nilli 'fad' occultists ... rather,I wish to address this to authentic mystics.

As you know the Menorah has seven branches,these are symbolic of various aspects,the seven ancient ones(Pleiades and the seven original planets),Kundalini with its seven chakras(energy centers),being the mystical serpent which lies coiled at the base of the spine and which,when activated arises as a cobra through these seven centers with its head coming to rest in the crown chakra,also there is the 'Sefirot' and the four worlds of emination,etc.

The first branch is that pertaining to the Hebrew letter 'Resh' which has a numerical value of 200 (keep these numbers in mind) and its planet is the sun,its color is yellow.The second branch belongs to the Hebrew letter 'Mem'(symbolic of water = Mayyim) and has numerical value of 40,white in color and corresponding to the moon(whose influence is upon water - Mem/mayyim).The third branch of the Menorah = Hebrew letter 'Yod' value is 10,planet is Mars,color is red.

The fourth = Hebrew letter 'Lamed',value 30,planet is Mercury and color is blue.The fifth branch = Hebrew letter 'Kof',value 20,planet Jupiter and color is purple.The sixth branch = Hebrew letter 'Shin'(symbolic of Shenkinah,queen of heaven),value is 300,planet is Venus and color is green.The seveth and final branch - Hebrew letter 'Tau'(meaning,sign/mark),value 400,planet is Saturn and color is black.

Of course the seven days of the week correspond to the seven branches beginning with the first branch 'Resh'(chief,beginning,etc) = Sunday,etc ... Now,simply count the total of all numerical values of the seven branches ... ie.. 200+40+10+30+20+300+400 = 1000.

I indeed gave it much thought before actually posting this in that certain rabbis would frown upon the sharing of such information in the sense that only initiates should be allowed to witness such matters,still,after giving it considerable thought I,as can be seen,chose to post this in that only they of rightful discernment will appreciate such matters while those in darkness will ultimately stumble all the more.
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Menorah

Postby Occult Forum Archive » Sun Nov 21, 2004 12:32 pm

Original post: fiat_lux_777

93

The seven branches of the Menorah are Babylonian in origin. They represent the seven lower sephiroth of Otz Chiim and is positioned (in Judaism) in the South of the temple. There is also the nine (sometimes eight) armed menora used during Chanukah.

From a magickal point-of-view the arms represent Chesed, Geburah, Tiphareth, Netzach, Hod, Yesod and Malkuth. It is representative of the Seven Creative Ideas (the Mystery of the Elohim), the seven classical planets, and the seven palaces of Assiah.

Can you please explain the letter attributions you have given for the arms? The letters are generally attributed to the paths of the Tree, not the Tree itself (the sephiroth being represented by the arms of the candlestick).

I indeed gave it much thought before actually posting this in that certain rabbis would frown upon the sharing of such information in the sense that only initiates should be allowed to witness such matters
It's okay.....I don't think you have anything to worry about ;)

93 93/93

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Menorah

Postby Occult Forum Archive » Sun Nov 21, 2004 12:35 pm

Original post: fiat_lux_777

93

Kundalini with its seven chakras(energy centers),being the mystical serpent which lies coiled at the base of the spine and which,when activated arises as a cobra through these seven centers with its head coming to rest in the crown chakra


I was unaware the ancient Hebrews practised tantra..... the Sephiroth on the Middle Pillar and the chakra system are not the same thing.

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Menorah

Postby Occult Forum Archive » Sun Nov 21, 2004 6:34 pm

Original post: crankyoldman

Well, the menorah was around long before Kabbalah was ever developed and before the Babylonian Exile as well, so I do not see how it can have symbolism connected with either, unless this symbolism is imposed in hindsight--which is often the case with Kabbalah anyhow. One obvious thing the seven branches do is emphasize the importance of the Sabbath, the seventh day. Observance of the Sabbath has always been the single most important ritual obligation in Judaism, so it makes sense that a symbolic reminder of it should be displayed in the Temple.

For me, the prescribed botanical design of the menorah is more interesting, especially the pomegranate shape of the tops. Just for fertility? That is the first commandment (be fruitful & multiply) after all, but I have often wondered what the pomegranate symbol might harken back to. Even now pomegranates figure in the decorations of Torah scrolls.

Also, the menorah makes an interesting representation of the burning bush. There is even a member of the Artemisia family that grows in the Middle East that spreads its branches laterally, like a menorah. As for it standing for Etz Chaim, the Tree of Life, it could be. Some people argue that the Temple was designed as a garden, in which case, the menorah could well stand for the Tree of Life, which in Genesis is described as conferring immortality. Then the pomegranate shape would make sense in terms of the immortality of progeny--and also because the pomegranate is dry and leathery, dead, on the outside but is juicy and very much alive on the inside. Perhaps this fruit was a good figuration of death--the body looks dead but that which is inside will continue to live--and so was thought to hang from the Tree of Life in the Garden.
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Menorah

Postby Occult Forum Archive » Sun Nov 21, 2004 7:16 pm

Original post: PaulS

The pre-Babylonian civilization of Sumer held seven as an important enough number to form the seven day week. It was based on the number of days between the quaters of the Moon. The lunar cycles were the basis of their calendar and their religious practices. I am not trying to connect the dots here but one of their celebrations came to mind while viewing this thread. Each Winter solstice the Sumerians enjoyed a week of holiday while the lunar calendar was corrected using the solar calendar. The temple priests would light an oil flame at the beginning of each night during the week.
Maybe the dots are connected and maybe not - I just find it interesting.

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Menorah

Postby Occult Forum Archive » Sun Nov 21, 2004 10:43 pm

Original post: crankyoldman

[QUOTE=PaulS]The pre-Babylonian civilization of Sumer held seven as an important enough number to form the seven day week. It was based on the number of days between the quaters of the Moon. [/QUOTE] Oh, I see what you're saying. I was thinking of the Babylonian Exile, which was way later--587-539 BCE. From what little I know of Sumerian mythology, it was pretty localized and fragmented, and its main influence on Judaism is the story of the Flood. But various sources I have read say that much of the astronomical info (and some magic, like demonology) associated with Judaism comes from the Babylonian Exile. Even the present-day Hebrew names of the months (which are indeed lunar months) are from that time.
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Menorah

Postby Occult Forum Archive » Mon Nov 22, 2004 5:19 am

Original post: PaulS

crankyoldman,
Actually Abraham lived the first part of his life in Sumer - in the city of Ur.
There are many things that the Babylonians and Jews borrowed from Sumer.

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Menorah

Postby Occult Forum Archive » Tue Nov 23, 2004 2:15 am

Original post: crankyoldman

Yes about Abraham, but is he not Abraham precisely because he turned away from what he had in Ur? He left it. I figure this could be as metaphorical as physical. But now I would like to do some reading on the Sumerians.

Talmudic story goes that Abraham was an idol-maker in Ur. The way I remember it, his son took all the statues one night and smashed them up. The next day he told his father that the statues had been fighting, and that's how they got broken. Abraham said they could not have been fighting--they were just statues. So his son asked him why then did his father worship them?

To me this attitude represents a pretty serious misreading of what a statue of a god is and how it functions in worship. I never could understand how anyone, not even the most "primitive" of people, could worship something as a god when they themselves had created it. I have always thought this was a calumny--that ancient people knew very well that those statues were not gods but only representations. What do you think? Did they know that?
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Menorah

Postby Occult Forum Archive » Tue Nov 23, 2004 2:38 am

Original post: PaulS

In Sumer the statues were constructed in such a way that the gods that were represented could inhabit the statues. In this way the statues actually became the gods. Each city temple housed the patron deity within a statue placed in the temple. The deity watched over the city and kept it from harm - so long as the people of the city did their part to please that deity and its representatives. (the priests and priestesses of the temple.

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Menorah

Postby Occult Forum Archive » Tue Nov 23, 2004 5:34 pm

Original post: Belzedek

[QUOTE=PaulS]In Sumer the statues were constructed in such a way that the gods that were represented could inhabit the statues. In this way the statues actually became the gods. Each city temple housed the patron deity within a statue placed in the temple. The deity watched over the city and kept it from harm - so long as the people of the city did their part to please that deity and its representatives. (the priests and priestesses of the temple.

PaulS[/QUOTE]

In Sumer,as in all ancient city-states,the ruler was a priest-king and as such he functioned both as the monarch whose voice was to be obeyed as well as the officiating priest in the temple,in fact his palace and the temple were one and the same.In this the priest-king was himself the living embodiment of the city-god,being viewed as co-regent with the primary god and in this sense held to be the 'son of god'.

It was common,as can be witnessed in surviving texts,that the priest-king oftentime would appoint his own daughter to act as high-priestess in the temple(thus,in this sense,women played a great role in religious matters),even in the code of Hammurabi there is strict laws regarding the proper conduct of a nun(virginal attendant of the gods),again showing the responsibility and respect shown to women in their role as attendents upon the gods.

Likewise,in regards to these early priest-kings,they bore the name of the city-god as the city itself carried the gods name.Consider ancient Jerusalem whose name was UruShalim(Uru - 'city',Shalim - 'god of dusk'),hence UruShalim means city of Shalim ... ie .. a city whose primary god was Shalim.
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Menorah

Postby Occult Forum Archive » Tue Nov 23, 2004 9:41 pm

Original post: crankyoldman

[QUOTE=PaulS]In Sumer the statues were constructed in such a way that the gods that were represented could inhabit the statues.[/QUOTE]
How do you mean? Were they hollow? And if the statue were broken, would it affect the god, in the opinion of the people who made the statues?
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Menorah

Postby Occult Forum Archive » Wed Nov 24, 2004 4:56 am

Original post: PaulS

[QUOTE=crankyoldman]How do you mean? Were they hollow? And if the statue were broken, would it affect the god, in the opinion of the people who made the statues?[/QUOTE]
oh now that would be funny.

No, I don't believe they were hollow but they were magically constructed - built with intent.

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